Online, Prints or Albums?

How do you like to look at your photographs? In the past the choices were print or slides. The prints were placed in albums and carefully labeled, or at the other end of the spectrum left in a box or trunk unmarked. Some photographs become part of the household display in frames on the mantle or hung on the wall. There have been instances when film was found undeveloped. The discovery of Vivian Maier, a noted street photographer comes to mind. If you aren’t familiar with her work the documentary, Finding Vivian Maier is worth watching. Many WWII film canisters have been found. Slides often in containers without a projector available.

I began my digital connection early with a 3mg pixel Sony Mavica on mini cds in about 2001. I liked the idea of seeing results immediately, but the digital world had a long way to go before I could use it consistently. The shutter lag, and resolution were not up to the task. I probably have the disks, somewhere. But the technology changed and even my iMac doesn’t have a CD player. My digital switch came in 2004 with my first dslr Nikon D70. Followed by D200, D7000, D600, D7100, Panasonic point & shoot, Olympus OMD-E5 mirrorless, and Fuji x100f. I use one of the highlighted cameras depending on my subject matter, and how much I want to shlep. They each serve the purpose and I can get great image from each one.

My photo collection in Lightroom CC is about 35500. I have used Adobe Lightroom since it began, and the changes also grew with the improvements in digital photography.  I retired from my teaching position and high school librarian. I have the need to be organized, and I like to  to have a place for everything. That includes cataloging my images. Lightroom (LR) originally was created to keep images organized. Photoshop was to take care of processing. I’m very glad the two work together now. I have keywords for my images going back to 2004, and my needs change. And crazy as it sounds,  I like to catalog my images. When I am stressed I often review, redo, and remember my photo journey. While making these changes I get to look back over my work. I enjoy this time. I review my growth, impressed by some of my earlier images, saw camera improvements especially in noise reduction, and the improved LR can assist with  changes.

I like to see my photographs enlarged and hanging around my house. Though these are not family snapshots. Many of the images were taken a while ago when I was enrolled in photography classes at the local community colleges. I use Nielsen Bainbridge frames, and I use Bay Photo service to print. Now in my new house I may change out some of these prints.  I also have a couple of photographs printed on metal from a local company with nice results.

I also like to be able to browse through albums though I haven’t kept this going as much. Shutterfly allows me to print books, and I find it easy to share my work. For an online presenceI like the way my work looks on my Flickr site. Flickr recently partnered with SmugMug and I hope that this will prove a positive move. I used SmugMug many years ago when I first started my very brief photography business. Family stuff happened. Now photography is for my pleasure!

Back to my original question. I enjoy my photographs in a variety of ways. In the back of my mind I need to think about my eyesight. My mother lost her eyesight due to macular degeneration. Unfortunately, I also have this condition. So far the dry version has a slow progression, and has not impaired my vision. So using a variety may help me in the long run.

So what do you do with all your images? I hope you enjoy them, and have fun creating.

 

 

Nature Photo Sharing Positively

Getting out with friends for a day of photography is how I get positive energy. My group of photo friends continues to grow, and our weekly shoots are great. I use Adobe Lightroom CC to organize and edit my images. I am up to date, and I set up a collection of my best photos from each outing.

I recently purchased the Nikon 70-200mm f4 lens, and I am pleased with the results. When I select a lens I take into consideration the quality of the glass, and the weight of the lens. I don’t want it to be too heavy that I dread carrying it around. This is a solid lens and it can be used with both a full frame and crop sensor camera. I use it with the Nikon D7100, a crop sensor.

UC Davis Arboretum provided the backdrop for this post. This is a place I like to return to because it changes so frequently. Today I chose to take a closer look at nature.

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Bee hard at work

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Couldn’t resist this amusing situation the tree found itself in!

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Yellow Jacket, pretty to look at, but I kept my distance with my new lens.

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Plant looked like all eyes were on me. Don’t know what kind of fruit was developing.

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Love the Dogwood Tree blossoms.

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Past glory. The play of colors caught my eye.

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Splash of color.

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Green Heart. Love!

Several walking bridges cross Putah Creek. Students have placed Love Lock messages along the way.

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Love Lock

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Happy Pine Cone Camper!

Hope you enjoy this closer look at nature. Getting out and looking at the world around me is good for positive karma. Take some time this weekend!

 

 

 

 

 

Mono Lake Tufas inspire me to try new photo processing techniques

Mono Lake is an ancient  65 square miles lake located 13 miles east of Yosemite National Park. It has no outlet, and continues to become increasingly salty. Amazing limestone rock formations called tufas form from fresh water springs interacting with alkaline lake water.

Mono Lake Tufas

Mono Lake Tufas

Tufa spires start underwater. Thirty foot formations become more visible as the lake levels decrease due to water diversions to Southern California.

Tufa Watches Over Mono Lake

Tufa Watches Over Mono Lake

In 1994 the State Water Resource Control Board in an effort to protect Mono Lake set limits on amount of water that could be diverted.

Gently Floating Along

Gently Floating Along

All kind of objects spring to mind when I look at a tufa rock formation.

Kissing Lambs

Kissing Lambs

It is so easy to imagine faces, and animals.

Animal Look-A-Like Tufa

Animal Look-A-Like Tufa

Serious Tufa

Serious Tufa

I spend time in the late afternoon watching birds around the lake. Some nest on the tufa. Later I photograph a sunset on the South Tufa side of Mono Lake.

Sunset over Tufas

Sunset over Tufas

Tufa Sunset

Tufa Sunset

Dramatic Sunset Over Mono Lake

Dramatic Sunset Over Mono Lake

Getting up early provides photographic rewards.

Sunrise Over Mono Lake

Sunrise Over Mono Lake

Summer Sunrise Over Watchful Tufas

Summer Sunrise Over Watchful Tufas

Early Morning at Mono Lake

Early Morning at Mono Lake

The tufas on Mono Lake are somewhat other worldly, and my photo processing skills felt free to experiment. I used Adobe Lightroom 5.7, Photomatrix Pro 5 and Topaz Plug-Ins: Detail and Adjust.

I semi reluctantly returned to Bodie and Mono Lake with my photography friends Anne and Laura.  My first experience had been clouded by altitude sickness. I am so glad that I set aside my trepidations and I came away with some good photographic memories. Note to self, always set aside initial reservations, and get out and make new memories.