Lens-Artists Photo Challenge # 222 The Mountains are Calling!

This week Amy (The World is a Book) has challenged me to go to the mountains, and so I shall. 
Traveling has been limited to Sacramento lately. Not exactly sure why. But these photo challenges gives me a good reason to check out my library. The highest mountain I ever visited was the Himalayas when I visited Nepal in 1965. At the time Kathmandu had traveler restrictions, and two small hotels. The Royal Nepal Airline had 3 planes, not a modern jet plane. We traveled between the peaks. A pretty scary ride. But alas I don’t have any photographs.
Sacramento is located two hours from the Sierras and Lake Tahoe. Heading east Donner Lake is a beautiful, quiet stop.

Donner Lake in the fall
Donner Lake in the winter
Yosemite in the Sierras
Yosemite
A weather change as I leave Yosemite
Flying over the Sierras
Outside Bodie located in the eastern Sierras. Do you see what I see?
Bodie California – the Sierras in the distance

Heading east the Sutter Buttes make for a rural landscape.

Cow posing.

Northern California’s Coast range provides many photo opportunities just as long as there is a place to pull over. Otherwise commuter traffic makes this prohibitive.

Stopping on this winding road between Livermore and San Jose.
Anne will always remember this drive!
Coastal Range taken near Big Basin Redwoods State Park

My first trip with my dslr Nikon D70 was to Seattle, Washington.

On a clear day I see Mt Rainier from my Seattle hotel room

So this ends my tour of my Western United States mountains that call to me. Any image catch your attention?

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #220 One Subject Three Ways

For this week’s challenge, Patti (P.A. Moed-Exploration in Words and Pictures) asks us to explore what professional photographers call “working a shot.” What does that mean? Photographers pick a subject (a place, an object, a person, for instance) and take a variety of photos–by zooming in on the details or stepping back for a wider view. They also vary the angle of the shot–looking up or down or even sideways. They might walk around the subject to get a unique view. 

Why? This method can help us discover the best way to capture the subject. And I agree that taking time and changing perspectives improves my photography.

An abandoned dock at the Berkeley Marina is the subject. First I create a frame for the dock. Then I move closer. I get closer still, creating a leading line with the dock. The seagull adds a bit of interest.

Getting closer

Color provides the subject matter for my images taken at a casino restaurant in Las Vegas. This ceiling really caught my attention, and I spent some time photographing it from many perspectives. I don’t know which one I favored.

I found this topiary display at Bellagio Las Vegas. With a fall-inspired nonmoving subject, I could take photographs from many angles. Which one is your favorite?

Taking flight
Wait for me!
Happy Landing

While visiting my parents in Sun City West, Arizona I wandered around with my Nikon d7100 camera. Plenty of downtimes when it is hot, and my retired parents are resting.

Fence
Golf Course. Golf ball, keep out!
Backyard view

Images of rusty things, gears, and machinery are often subjects of mine. Using different f-stops and focusing on different parts make for interesting photos. My last photograph fits my idea of pareidolia.

Gears
Round About
Do you see a face?

Found this beetle on a cactus in Sedona, Arizona. When I stepped back the cactus reminded me of Mickey Mouse ears. Walking away, the landscape called for another look resulting in a wonderful landscape of the desert.

What kind of beetle is this?
Mouse ears
Sedona Desert

This last image of a California poppy compliments my banner image. Often I like the backlit look when I take photographs of flowers and foliage.

Backlit California Poppy!

The one thing most of these images have in common when it comes to looking at life from different perspectives is that most objects did not move. My fast-moving Moxie would be another story. Stop, slow down, and look at life from different angles! You may be surprised!

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #202 Minimalism/Maximalism

Sofia’s challenge is called Minimalism/Maximalism. It could also be Simplicity/Complexity or Sparce/Full. It’s up to me to show how I approach this challenge. I’ll have to think about this as I look over my library of photographs.

Life during the pandemic gave me time to think. Since I was home, as many of you were, I had time to look around my house. The idea of ‘Decluttering” and “Reimagining” space in our homes found its way into the media. Television, podcasts, and how to books popped up. I think I vacillate between the two. When I have my cleaning staff come to may house, I put away many things on my counters. The house is cleaned, and when I look around I have some satisfaction. But I still need some eye candy. On my new kitchen counter I place a Nixplay Frame. In the morning I turn it on, and throughout the day I am reminded of times in my life. l love my frame, and I am constantly adding new photographs. I also have some kind of silk flower arrangement, and two plants that require little water. Anything else makes my kitchen feel cluttered.

I ebb and flow between straightening out things, and letting life happen. But then the sentimental side shows up. I enjoy having things around that bring back good memories. Some items came from my parents house from when I was younger. Other items were given to me, and I remember the occasion. And other objects just seem to fit in a particular space.

My photography finds new ways to grow. Looking over my library I discovered that the coast is a great place to create minimalist photographs.

Taken on Florida’s beaches with my Nikon D70, my first dslr
Simple structure at Pt.Reyes
Seagull joins the family on the beach.

Many of my photographs have a busy quality. One teacher criticized me for this. I just say that it is my artistic preference. Sometimes I like to let my eye wander.

Taken on a photo shoot to Bodie, Ca. with my class. This is an example of “arrested decay”.
More from a town frozen in time, Bodie, Ca.

In the following photographs I like to look for familiar things within. Pareidolia used to be seen as a mental illness, but now is considered normal creative thinking.

Black Chasm Caves in Volcano, Ca.
Do you see what I see?
Here is an example of maximalism in a window display in Carmel, Ca.
Putting a smile on your face with some minimalism to end this post.

So I guess minimalism and maximalism both have a place in my photography.

A Photowalk in Niles

Getting away with photo friends and introducing them to my brother Alan made for an enjoyable and interesting day. My brother lives in Freemont, Ca. and found this little old town flavor in Niles about a mile from his address. Car loaded with friends, cameras, and gas we headed off to Niles. I was driving Subi Blue, and just as we started the infamous I symbol appeared on my dashboard indicating a low tire sensor. We boldly continued the two-hour journey.

After passing under a railroad trestle we arrived in Niles, Ca.

This old restored gas station serves as a meeting spot for car enthusiasts.

Unique stores line 1st Street (Main Street). Forget trademarks here. Plenty of antique stores, but since we are here on a Thursday we find many stores closed.

My brother served as our own personal guide to a town he walks around frequently. He knows most of the small business owners and often photographs events in town. The weather cooperates and we found plenty of photo opportunities in nature and architecture.

This wisteria tree has over the years intertwined with another tree.

Oh what a tangled web we weave.
Tangled
Wisteria in bloom
A Lady Bug

An original house.
Bath anyone?
Each house an individual
I liked the way the light fell on these hats

Silent movies and Charlie Chaplin have solid connections with Niles, Ca. On our way home, we drove through Niles Canyon used as a backdrop for cowboy films in the early days of movie-making.

It turns out the air in the tire was low, so off to find a working air pump, and tossing in a bunch of quarters, and home we went.

This little Tortuga Talavera followed me home.

And we returned safely.