Lens Artists Challenge #168: Seen better days!

This week Tina invited me to share images of places and things that have, “seen better days”. Evidence of our past is easily found here in Northern California. When I go out with my camera in hand, I am on the lookout for these abandoned items, settings, and buildings.

I came across this abandoned bee hive in our local nature preserve, Effie Yeaw.
These passengers have seen better days! This Thunderbird set the stage for Halloween parked in Old Fair Oaks
Greeting travelers in Strawberry, California
What’s the story behind this Buick? Could this be a subject for a crime novel?

Some cars make it into an auto museum and some cars are just abandoned.

The base for what kind of vehicle?
I wonder what was the price of gas when this gas station closed?
The innards before pumps went digital.

How many times have you misplaced an article of clothing? I’m surprised at where these lonely ones were found.

A scarecrow could still make use of this straw hat!
Flip flops flop after a grueling hike in Kauai

Gold and silver mining had much to do with the creation and downfall of many towns in Northern California. Bodie is one such example. In 1962 Bodie became Bodie State Historic Park, and an official gold rush ghost town. It is an example of “arrested decay”.

This pier off of Berkeley Marina needs a little work! But some wildlife finds it useful.
This may have worked for Superman, but forget about making a call.

When my friend Anne and I went out with a fellow photographer Greg we often ended up exploring forgotten place such as Knight’s Landing.

Knight’s Landing railroad trestle crossing the Sacramento River.
Knight’s Landing water tower along the Sacramento River.
Found in Marysville, Ca. this safe is no longer secure.
I took this photo the day after Valentine’s Day in New York City. I hope the flowers were appreciated.

Taking photographs of items with history behind them makes me think about the back story.

Summer is here, looking for chill in Petaluma

Camera Totin’ Tuesday folks are looking to get out of the Sacramento heat. Petaluma is located south west of Sacramento, and less than 2 hours away. The day we visited the weather did not disappoint.

Founded in 1858 Petaluma makes an effort to maintain a mid-19th century charm. Located on the Petaluma River and close to the Bay area, Petaluma provided locally grown food to San Francisco and Oakland starting during the Gold Rush. Today, it can serve as a jumping off spot in Sonoma County. Close to the coast of Point Reyes, 30 minutes outside of the Bay Area, and near Napa and there is plenty to photograph is this town.

The Petaluma River provided easy access to transport goods to the coast. Today, it serves as a focal point for the town’s center.

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Bridge over the Petaluma River

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Decaying pier no longer supports train tracks.

The Free Public Library building is filled with such classic details. This library built in 1904 with money donated by Andrew Carnegie is one of over 1600 library buildings constructed in the United States between 1886-1919. The town had to come up with money for books, salaries, and maintenance. Born poor, Carnegie was denied use of a public library because he couldn’t afford the $2.00 library card. He proclaimed “Free Public Library” on the front of this building to show that all could make use of the facility. Carnegie understood that access to information improves a person’s ability to better oneself.

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Petaluma Historical Library & Museum

Philanthropist  Andrew Carnegie gave away 90% of his wealth.”The man who dies rich dies in disgrace,” Carnegie said. In bestowing charity the main consideration should be to help those who help themselves,” he wrote.

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The buildings are impressive. I photographed this one in Eureka, California. Many serve another purpose now such as museums, and community centers. As a retired librarian, I hope that these buildings continue to serve the public need for information.

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Eureka Springs Carnegie Library

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The McNears were part of Petaluma history

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Brick wall with window capture my attention

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Time out for a tune!

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Small town main street today

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Green Tower Clock

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Display Window of a music store

Lunch was enjoyed at The New Yorker Pizza & Restaurant.  I’m always on the lookout for “New York Pizza”. Though this time I enjoyed the meatball hero. Afterward we wondered into the Shutterbug Camera Store. Money was safely tucked away. This time.

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Faded sign on side of building

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Spider makes a home

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One of many Victorian Era houses

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Arch and picket fence detail draws me in

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Always looking for signs. So polite!

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Bee sure is enjoying a drink

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Bee has moved on. What is this flower called? Be Gone!

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Soft purple frilly flower. Do you know the name?

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Love the lighting on this pretty coral rose. I do know the general name.

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He loves me. He loves me not? He loves me!

There are many churches in Petaluma. Taking a walking tour we came across a church on nearly every block.

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Stain Glass found in St. Vincent de Paul Church

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Abstract lines

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A friendly, portable tripod

We ended our walk around town. Taking in the architecture, nature, and friendly spirit of my photo buddies. Good bye Petaluma. May be back again.